Anyone for Speech Therapy?


Anyone for Speech Therapy?

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mysweetboy
mysweetboy
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Hi, I have just started Speech Therapy with my, just turned 2 year old Son. I would like to hear from anyone else who has had a child in speech therapy and how things have progressed.



My child said a few words about 6 months ago, and then stopped and has not said anything since. He still babbles in his baby voice, but no distinctive words. Has anyone else had a similar experience? I would like to hear from anyone regarding either enquiry. Thanks.
Chocolate_Moose_80
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Hi, my son turned 2 in October, and isn't saying many words either. Like your son, he had a couple of words when he was younger, which he doesn't say any more. I first spoke to our GP when he wasn't pointing much at 12 months, who sent us to a Paediatrician. He's also seen a developmental paediatrician for a full assessment, the result being most things are on track, except his expressive and receptive language skills, and his social skills.



My son has been having speech therapy, since he was about 18 months old, and during that time we've seen a few different private therapists, while being on public waiting lists. The therapist we see at the moment is fantastic, but the one we saw previously gave us very vague advice which was also very obvious. I think it's very important to find a therapist who you like.



Best advice we have had is:



- Lifting up his hand to make him point to pictures in books, if he doesn't point by himself. eg. If he doesn't point when I say "where is the cat?", I lift up his hand, place it on the cat, and wait for him to look at it, then give lots of encouragement and praise.

- Using very simple language - singles words - when possible.

- Waiting for him to respond - sometimes this takes longer than we as adults have patience for.

- Playing games that require taking turns. He puts a block on the tower, then I do, then he does, etc.

- Holding off on giving him what he wants, to encourage him to say "more". One grape at a time, for example.

- Having a couple of days a week at childcare where the carers don't know exactly what he wants all the time.



I think it is pretty common for boys to be late talkers, lots of Mums have told me that their child didn't talk till age 3. I think it is more serious when they also seem to not be understanding as much as other kids -which is the case for my son.



In terms of improvement, I can't say if the therapy has had any direct effects for him. I feel that a lot of the advice is centered around simply spending time with him - turning off the tv and getting on the floor to play together - which is something i did anyway. He is improving gradually, hard to say whether as a result of the therapy though. My thoughts are that it's better safe than sorry - while the therapy is quite expensive, all the advice seems to be centered on early intervention - and the regrets would be huge if a long term problem was not dealt with now.



All the best for you and your son. Would love to hear any advice you have had that has been helpful too.

Jenz3910
Jenz3910
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The effectiveness of speech therapy depends on why the child isn't/can't talk.

Speech therapy can be a great help to the child and parents if it's used correctly.



I have quite a few friends whose children have Autism.

A few of them need/needed speech therapy. Their children weren't communicating at ALL - pointing is a big thing. If your child doesn't point, he or she may be on the specrum.

Not saying that all kids point and if they're not they have autistic. But it's something to consider.



I know of kids who have gone into speech therapy not speaking, and come out the end of it speaking like they've always spoken well.



Good luck with it, it takes time and patience xxx

Megan77
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Hi there.  My daughter is 2 and 4 mths and also does not say a lot.  We took her to a speech therapist as I was worried becsuse she was not saying much and kids around her were.

The speech therapy was a waste of time and money for us.  The therapist told me to do things that i already do and charged a huge amount of money!  We did go back for a second consultation and she spent 30 minutes of the 45 minute session trying to get her to say "more".  All this did was frustrate my daughter (she was over at the door turning the handle trying to get out) and me!

I read a LOT to my little one and she has started to say a lot more words.  She understands everything that is said but is just not verbalising as much.  I think if your little boy understands what is going on and is happy, then he will get there eventually.  That is what I a hoping for us too!

Megan

karla@speech
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Hi mysweetboy

I hope you managed to get some good advice about your son's language development by now. I see your post was over a year ago now. I am a Speech Pathologist and the other responses are right in a way, you will meet good Speech Therapists and not so good ones. How is your son travelling now? Chocolate Moose has some great ideas and suggestions. It's important to note that a late talker is technically defined as someone who has delays in just expressive language not receptive (understanding). If a child has delays in both areas, this is called a language delay and speech therapy is recommended in particular as these children only have a 50% chance of catching up to their peers. I have a blog, so why not pop over and check it out as I have some great tips for language development there. http://www.speechtherapyalbury.com.au/blog.aspx
JulioHero
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Hi. My Son is turning 3. When he was born, doctors told us thatshe would be a "slow-learner" Sad Right now he's not saying anything. He interacts with us, hugs, but no talk.
I was wondering if we could start some sensory therapy with him, or is he too young? My wife found this Sensory Therapy Reviews and Blog, but aww, I have no idea which program or therapy would be suitable for a three year old.
Symo
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Chocolate_Moose_80 - 16/02/2012
Hi, my son turned 2 in October, and isn't saying many words either. Like your son, he had a couple of words when he was younger, which he doesn't say any more. I first spoke to our GP when he wasn't pointing much at 12 months, who sent us to a Paediatrician. He's also seen a developmental paediatrician for a full assessment, the result being most things are on track, except his expressive and receptive language skills, and his social skills.

My son has been having speech therapy, since he was about 18 months old, and during that time we've seen a few different private therapists, while being on public waiting lists. The therapist we see at the moment is fantastic, but the one we saw previously gave us very vague advice which was also very obvious. I think it's very important to find a therapist who you like.

Best advice we have had is:

- Lifting up his hand to make him point to pictures in books, if he doesn't point by himself. eg. If he doesn't point when I say "where is the cat?", I lift up his hand, place it on the cat, and wait for him to look at it, then give lots of encouragement and praise.
- Using very simple language - singles words - when possible.
- Waiting for him to respond - sometimes this takes longer than we as adults have patience for.
- Playing games that require taking turns. He puts a block on the tower, then I do, then he does, etc.
- Holding off on giving him what he wants, to encourage him to say "more". One grape at a time, for example.
- Having a couple of days a week at childcare where the carers don't know exactly what he wants all the time.

I think it is pretty common for boys to be late talkers, lots of Mums have told me that their child didn't talk till age 3. I think it is more serious when they also seem to not be understanding as much as other kids -which is the case for my son.

In terms of improvement, I can't say if the therapy has had any direct effects for him. I feel that a lot of the advice is centered around simply spending time with him - turning off the tv and getting on the floor to play together - which is something i did anyway. He is improving gradually, hard to say whether as a result of the therapy though. My thoughts are that it's better safe than sorry - while the therapy is quite expensive, all the advice seems to be centered on early intervention - and the regrets would be huge if a long term problem was not dealt with now.

All the best for you and your son. Would love to hear any advice you have had that has been helpful too.

My community nurse sent my son and I at 18 months because she felt he did not have enough words.

My first appointment was alarming because we were asked a bunch of questions and then given a score. 

I was so sleep deprived and my answers were not in context because when asked "if you ask your son can he go to his bedroom and bring you a toy, can he do this?" My reply was no, because there are two toddler gates between our lounge and bedroom....😑😑😑 this was recorded as no. The score was a concern for my sons comprehension. 

A week later and copius research before appt #2. And it went much better, I aksed for information to help the situation. Was recommended a book

"It takes two to talk" by jan pepper and elaine weitzman.

It was helpful, it made me more aware of my nature to do too much for my son which was probably one cause of his limited vocab. I anticipated his needs so he rarely had to communicate what he wanted.

Some changes and now at almost 2.5 he has been assessed again and the score was a 70% improvement and no concerns.

I rec intervention early.
Ella Fernando
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Speech Therapy Expert helping children with language difficulties related to developmental delays and children with literacy difficulties, as well as those falling behind in their academic skills.
  • Individual therapy
  • Group sessions
  • Speech and language assessments
  • Reading assessments
  • Preschool and School consultations
  • Written reports
  • Academic and pre-academic skills
All the best wishes for you and your son.

[post edited by Moderator]
Edited
20/04/2017 by Moderator
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